davidfincher
Sophie, the girl, is given a spell and transformed into an old woman. It would be a lie to say that turning young again would mean living happily ever after. I didn’t want to say that. I didn’t want to make it seem like turning old was such a bad thing — the idea was that maybe she’ll have learned something by being old for a while, and, when she is actually old, make a better grandma. Anyway, as Sophie gets older, she gets more pep. And she says what’s on her mind. She is transformed from a shy, mousy little girl to a blunt, honest woman. It’s not a motif you see often, and, especially with an old woman taking up the whole screen, it’s a big theatrical risk. But it’s a delusion that being young means you’re happy.
Hayao Miyazaki, on what attracted him to Howl’s Moving Castle (via thefictioned)
raysperson

"The idea that there was this person who refused to eat so that he could be heard was very strange to an 11-year-old. The clock was ticking and the days went by and he wouldn’t eat. Even if I didn’t understand exactly what it was all about, it struck me. You know, as a child, you’re sat down at the table and your mother tells you that you’re not going to leave the table until you’ve eaten your food. She tells you what time you’re going to go to bed, what you’re going to wear, and this sort of refusal to eat showed a kind of power in the act because as a child that was the only relationship I could have to a hunger strike." [x]

- Steve McQueen